Welcome

Greetings to thousands of readers the past month from the United States and Canada, as well as the United Kingdom, Russia, India, Germany, France, Japan and Latvia.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Trade issues a concern to Canadian government after Trump comments



   Canada column for Sunday, April 23/17

   THE CANADIAN REPORT
   (c) By Jim Fox

   The Canadian government is stressing the importance of trade with the United States after President Donald Trump said Canada is “taking advantage” of U.S. workers.
   In the first bitter criticism of the North American Free Trade Agreement as it relates to Canada, Trump called it a “disaster” especially in dairy farming, lumber and energy.
   “We're going to have to get to the negotiating table with Canada very, very quickly,” he said.
   Earlier, after meeting Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Trump praised the bilateral trade relationship and recommended only some “tweaking.”
   More details about the irritants and suggested NAFTA changes are expected in a few weeks.
   Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said Canada buys five times more dairy products than it sells to the U.S. while a protracted dispute on lumber would drive up U.S. housing costs.
   The stable supply of oil from Canada – one-third of all U.S. imports – was called the job-creating lifeblood of the U.S. economy.
   “Any increase of trade barriers between our countries would significantly impact jobs in the United States, as well as in Canada,” she added.

Monday, April 17, 2017

Marijuana legalization planned for Canada in 2018



   Canada column for Sunday, April 16/17

   THE CANADIAN REPORT
   (c) By Jim Fox

   The Liberal government – as promised during the 2015 election campaign – is moving ahead with legalizing recreational marijuana use for those 18 and older.
   It’s being called a “bold and risky social experiment” by many and would include tough laws against illicit dealers and those who break them.
   Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said legalizing pot is the best way to keep the drug from being used by younger, impressionable children.
   The law change would become effective in July of next year and end the prohibition on marijuana use that Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said has been an “abject failure.”
   Police forces are spending billions of dollars and countless resources dealing with drug use while dealers are profiting by up to $8 billion a year, he said.
   Liberal politician Bill Blair, former Toronto police chief, said this will promote the “safe, socially responsible use” of marijuana while at the same time rigidly enforcing impaired driving whether by drugs or alcohol.
   The Conservative party called the legalization a bad idea while the socialist New Democrats wanted it sooner.

Monday, April 10, 2017

U.S. is "comfortable" with security at the Canadian border



   Canada column for Sunday, April 9/17

   THE CANADIAN REPORT
   (c) By Jim Fox

   Canadians should not be overly concerned about the possibility of stricter security or changes in travel to the United States.
   U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly told a Senate committee that his concerns are mainly with the Mexican border and he’d like to see the Canadian border “even thinner.”
   He made a similar comment during meetings in Ottawa, saying he’s “very comfortable with the level of security on the border.”
   Something drawing attention is a “little bit” more enterprising Mexicans entering the U.S. illegally via Canada.
   Montana Democrat Jonathan Tester said the northern border also has its “challenges,” suggesting more stringent security as did North Dakota Republican Senator John Hoeven.
   “I’m concerned with all the borders,'” Kelly said, adding that the “absolutely great news story in the northern border is that we have Canada there that’s a friend and ally.”
   Canada has “tremendous law enforcement . . .  and they’re very careful about who comes into their country,” Kelly said.

    ---

Sunday, April 2, 2017

Vehicle research center planned in Ottawa with Blackberry engineers



   Canada column for Sunday, April 2/17

   THE CANADIAN REPORT
   (c) By Jim Fox

   Four-hundred BlackBerry engineers from Canada and the United States are being hired by the Ford Motor Co. for a connected-vehicle research center in Ottawa.
   It’s part of a $500-million investment that will include increasing sustainability and fuel economy research at Ford plants in Windsor and Oakville, Ontario.
   There will be additional facilities in Waterloo, Ontario, BlackBerry’s hometown; Cary, North Carolina; and Sunrise, Florida.
   This will be Ford’s first center focused on connectivity research and advanced technology in Canada.
   The federal and Ontario governments are giving grants of $100 million to Ford for the projects, part of a $1.2-billion technology partnership.
   It will include research and development on features such as infotainment, in-vehicle modems, gateway modules, driver-assist features and autonomous vehicles.

    ---